Guaranteed Bandwidth

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  oguretz 10 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #41531

    oguretz
    Member

    How can i set guaranteed bandwidth for only 1 client in LAN?
    For example i have zeroshell box with 1mbps internet connection (ppp0 through eth00) and 5 clients on the eth01, and i don’t want to have less than 512kbps on one of client (others can have less, of course).

    Thanks before to all replies.

    #47759

    ppalias
    Member

    Go to Network-> Qos
    Enable Qos on the outgoing interfaces on the “interface manager”, create a class with the reserved bandwidth and the priority you want it to have in “class manager”, finally on “classifier” add a new rule that will match the source IP address you want and will target the class you created one step back.
    After you do all these add the class on the outgoing interface.

    #47760

    oguretz
    Member

    thanks ^_^

    this applies on outgoing or incoming bandwidth?

    #47761

    ppalias
    Member

    Outgoing only, there is no point to shape incoming traffic.

    #47762

    oguretz
    Member

    you mean shaping of incoming traffic is not available? or it is not necessary? because i want to guarantee only incoming bandwidth… as user of course

    #47763

    ppalias
    Member

    There is no concept of “shaping” on incoming traffic.

    @Linux Advanced Routing and Traffic Control wrote:

    Scheduling
    A qdisc may, with the help of a classifier, decide that some packets need to go out earlier than others. This process is called Scheduling, and is performed for example by the pfifo_fast qdisc mentioned earlier. Scheduling is also called ‘reordering’, but this is confusing.

    Shaping
    The process of delaying packets before they go out to make traffic confirm to a configured maximum rate. Shaping is performed on egress. Colloquially, dropping packets to slow traffic down is also often called Shaping.

    Policing
    Delaying or dropping packets in order to make traffic stay below a configured bandwidth. In Linux, policing can only drop a packet and not delay it – there is no ‘ingress queue’.

    #47764

    mastershaper can shape incoming – outgoing traffic, and that program works with tc / iptables layer7 time route support

    #47765

    fadjar340
    Member

    @oguretz:

    Please understand that incoming is view from client, it mean downloading. The view from shaper is outgoing. This happened on LAN interface that connect to the clients. So, that why another term came up with egress and and ingress.

    Please CMIIW…

    Fadjar T

    #47766

    ppalias
    Member

    Incoming or ingress is the same, traffic coming to an interface. Outgoing or egress is traffic going out of an interface.
    Usually you shape traffic coming from a high bandwidth interface going to a low bandwidth interface.
    You CANNOT shape incoming traffic, if you want to shape your incoming traffic you have to do it on the other end of the link.

    #47767

    oguretz
    Member

    but – i know in linux there are something called “wondershaper”. It shapes ingress traffic as good as egress. And i want to just set in the highest priority traffic from one machine, connected to zeroshell box.

    #47768

    ppalias
    Member

    You shape traffic coming from a higher speed network and going to a lower speed network. Of course you could shape incoming traffic with various ways (such as IMQ), but what for? Your traffic that comes from a slow WAN connection to a fast LAN network doesn’t need shaping, packets will be distributed very quickly to their destination. You want to shape traffic that goes from the LAN to the WAN so that time sensitive packets get higher priority than bulk traffic.

    #47769

    alank2
    Member

    Hi,

    Ok, but here is my question. What if you want to “reserve” some of that incoming bandwidth for higher priority data such as VoIP? Is there a way to limit the other types of incoming traffic somehow? Assuming you can’t modify the other end that is sending it…

    Thanks,

    Alan

    #47770

    ppalias
    Member

    You can policy the traffic, which means that you will set a higher limit and drop anything exceeding that. But I don’t think you need that, cause as I said from the low bandwidth WAN connection the packets will be transfered to a high bw LAN connection, where there is plenty of bandwidth and no reservation is needed UNLESS your router is a source of traffic towards the LAN (fileserver for example). In that case you can shape the outgoing traffic to the LAN, to prioritize the flows you want.

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